FinX – an alternative to propeller inspired by the most beautiful inventions of nature

Finx

Startup FinX first presented at a boat show in Paris the details of its innovative propulsion system that simulates the movement of fish fins.
An innovative solution is to replace the propeller with a wave-like moving membrane. This is a membrane by which a linear motor (in this case an electric one) sets the wave motion, so that water is sucked in from one side and then ejected from the other.

Harold Guillemin (Harold Guillemin) founded the FinX startup in May 2019, by the winter he collected funding in the amount of 450 thousand euros and presented his project at a boat show in Paris last December.

The FinX project team consists of 6 young promising engineers. The team is supported by an advisory board, which includes Loyk Peyron (navigator) and Jeremy Lagarrig (general manager of Energy Observer).

“The principle of operation of the pump built into the head of the propulsion unit resembles that of a loudspeaker: a magnet creates a magnetic field, and a voice coil through which an alternating electric current passes vibrates and transmits movement to the membrane. In fact, a progressive pulsation is used, which is formed on the periphery of the membrane and moves to its center. And it is this pulsation that sucks the liquid from it, from the periphery to the center. Without any rotating parts. It is just ripples. This has nothing to do with the jet propulsion used on some motor boats.

The idea is that we do not mix the liquid, but move it in a straight line. We do not have the problem of high speeds “at the tip of the blade”, there is no problem with cavitation, we only work with the vibration of the membrane, and this leads to movement.

This drive is absolutely non-inertial, like a fish. After two pulses of the fin, the fish travels a fairly large distance and may be near you. The first wave on the membrane immediately gives the desired hydraulic power.

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